Momentum (3 of 16) Impulse, An Explanation | Summary and Q&A

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October 27, 2017
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Momentum (3 of 16) Impulse, An Explanation

TL;DR

Impulse is the product of force and time, while momentum is the product of mass and velocity. They are related through the equation: force times time equals change in momentum.

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Questions & Answers

Q: What is impulse and how is it calculated?

Impulse is the product of force and time over which the force acts. It is calculated by multiplying the force applied (in Newtons) by the time it is applied (in seconds).

Q: How are impulse and momentum related?

Impulse and momentum are related through the equation force times time equals change in momentum. In order to change an object's velocity, a force must be applied over time.

Q: What is the difference between impulse and momentum?

Impulse is a measure of the change in momentum, while momentum is the product of an object's mass and velocity. Impulse can cause a change in an object's momentum.

Q: How does the force and time applied affect an object's velocity?

Applying a force over a longer period of time will result in a smaller force exerted on the object and a slower change in velocity. Applying a force over a shorter period of time will result in a larger force and a quicker change in velocity.

Summary & Key Takeaways

  • Impulse is defined as the product of force and time over which the force acts. It describes the effect of a force acting over a period of time.

  • Applying a force over time will change the velocity of an object, as velocity change requires an unbalanced force over time.

  • The symbol for impulse is J, and its unit is Newton seconds (N·s).

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