What You Can Do to Prevent Alzheimer's | Lisa Genova | TED | Summary and Q&A

3.2M views
May 19, 2017
by
TED
YouTube video player
What You Can Do to Prevent Alzheimer's | Lisa Genova | TED

TL;DR

This content discusses the possibility of changing the course of Alzheimer's disease by understanding its neuroscience and adopting preventative measures to delay its onset.

Install to Summarize YouTube Videos and Get Transcripts

Questions & Answers

Q: What is the current understanding of the neuroscience of Alzheimer's disease?

The neuroscience of Alzheimer's disease focuses on the synapse, the point of connection between neurons, where neurotransmitters are released. Alzheimer's occurs when amyloid beta, a small peptide, accumulates in the synapse and forms sticky aggregates called amyloid plaques.

Q: When do amyloid plaques start to accumulate in the brain?

Amyloid plaques can start accumulating in the brain as early as the age of 40. However, individuals at this stage are usually unaware of any impairments in memory, language, or cognition.

Q: How can we prevent or delay the onset of Alzheimer's?

There are several lifestyle factors that can help prevent or delay the onset of Alzheimer's disease. These include getting enough sleep, maintaining cardiovascular health through exercise and a healthy diet, and engaging in mentally stimulating activities.

Q: What is cognitive reserve and how does it relate to Alzheimer's?

Cognitive reserve refers to the brain's ability to adapt and maintain cognitive function despite the presence of Alzheimer's pathology. People with more years of education, higher literacy levels, and regular engagement in mentally stimulating activities have a higher cognitive reserve, which can buffer them from symptoms even if they have Alzheimer's pathology in their brains.

Summary

In this video, the speaker discusses Alzheimer's disease and its impact on the brain. She explains the accumulation of amyloid beta plaques and the molecular processes that lead to the clinical symptoms of the disease. The speaker also explores the current focus on preventing amyloid plaque accumulation as a potential treatment for Alzheimer's. Additionally, she highlights several lifestyle factors that can influence the risk of developing the disease, such as sleep, cardiovascular health, and cognitive stimulation. Finally, the speaker emphasizes the importance of cognitive reserve and the potential for individuals to maintain resilience and function, even in the presence of Alzheimer's pathology.

Questions & Answers

Q: What is Alzheimer's disease and why is it so feared?

Alzheimer's is a neurodegenerative disease that primarily affects memory, language, and cognition. It is feared because there is currently no cure or disease-modifying treatment for Alzheimer's. It is widely believed that the disease progresses slowly over many years before noticeable symptoms appear, making it difficult to intervene effectively.

Q: What role do amyloid plaques play in the development of Alzheimer's?

Amyloid plaques, composed of sticky aggregates of amyloid beta peptides, are believed to be a key feature of Alzheimer's disease. The accumulation of these plaques is thought to disrupt the function and communication between neurons, leading to cognitive decline. Understanding and preventing amyloid plaque accumulation is a major focus of research and drug development for Alzheimer's.

Q: How do genetics influence the risk of developing Alzheimer's?

While genetics can play a role in increasing or decreasing the risk of Alzheimer's, they do not solely determine whether someone will develop the disease. Certain genetic variants, such as APOE4, have been associated with an increased risk of amyloid plaque accumulation. However, other factors, such as lifestyle and environmental influences, also contribute to the development of the disease.

Q: How does sleep deprivation affect the risk of Alzheimer's?

Sleep deprivation has been linked to an increase in amyloid beta accumulation in the brain. It is believed that the brain's clearance of metabolic waste, including amyloid beta, occurs during deep sleep. Therefore, poor sleep hygiene and disruption of this clearance process may contribute to the development of Alzheimer's disease.

Q: How does cardiovascular health impact the risk of Alzheimer's?

Cardiovascular factors, such as high blood pressure, diabetes, obesity, smoking, and high cholesterol, have been associated with an increased risk of developing Alzheimer's. Studies have shown a strong connection between cardiovascular disease and Alzheimer's, emphasizing the importance of maintaining a heart-healthy lifestyle to counter the risk of the disease.

Q: Can lifestyle choices and cognitive activities prevent Alzheimer's?

Yes, lifestyle choices and cognitive activities can potentially prevent or delay the onset of Alzheimer's. Engaging in mentally stimulating activities, such as learning new skills or pursuing education, can help build cognitive reserve and strengthen neural connections. Additionally, adopting a Mediterranean diet and maintaining overall cardiovascular health have been shown to reduce the risk of developing the disease.

Q: Can cognitive reserve protect against the symptoms of Alzheimer's?

Cognitive reserve refers to the ability of the brain to withstand and compensate for pathological changes associated with Alzheimer's disease. It is characterized by having an abundance of functional synapses and neural connections. People with higher cognitive reserve, often through factors like years of education and mental stimulation, may experience fewer symptoms even in the presence of Alzheimer's pathology.

Q: How does learning new things contribute to cognitive reserve?

Learning new things stimulates neural plasticity, which allows for the creation and strengthening of new neural connections or synapses. This accumulation of synapses contributes to cognitive reserve. Learning activities that are rich in meaning and engage multiple senses, such as learning a new language or reading a book, are particularly effective in building cognitive reserve.

Q: Are people with Alzheimer's doomed to lose their emotional memory?

No, people with Alzheimer's disease can still retain their emotional memory. Emotional memory refers to the ability to experience and understand emotions, such as love and joy, even if specific memories or facts are forgotten. Emotional connections and feelings can have a lasting impact, even in the face of memory decline.

Q: What are the key takeaways from this talk?

The key takeaways are that Alzheimer's disease is a complex condition with no cure, but there are steps individuals can take to potentially prevent or delay its onset. Lifestyle factors such as sleep, cardiovascular health, and cognitive stimulation can influence the risk of developing the disease. Additionally, the concept of cognitive reserve highlights the importance of lifelong learning and mental stimulation in maintaining resilience even in the presence of Alzheimer's pathology. Overall, while there is no definitive solution, a combination of lifestyle choices and cognitive activities can help individuals lead healthier lives and potentially reduce the impact of Alzheimer's.

Summary & Key Takeaways

  • Alzheimer's disease is likely to affect a significant portion of the population as they age and there is currently no cure or disease-modifying treatment available.

  • Amyloid beta plaques, which accumulate in the synapses of the brain, are believed to be a key factor in the development of Alzheimer's.

  • There are lifestyle factors that can influence the accumulation of plaques and potentially delay or prevent the onset of Alzheimer's, such as getting enough sleep and maintaining cardiovascular health.

Share This Summary 📚

Summarize YouTube Videos and Get Video Transcripts with 1-Click

Download browser extensions on:

Explore More Summaries from TED 📚

Summarize YouTube Videos and Get Video Transcripts with 1-Click

Download browser extensions on: