Dawn Phenomenon: High Fasting Blood Sugar Levels On Keto & IF | Summary and Q&A

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June 24, 2019
by
Dr. Sten Ekberg
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Dawn Phenomenon: High Fasting Blood Sugar Levels On Keto & IF

TL;DR

This video explains the dawn phenomenon, why diabetics and insulin-resistant individuals have a greater response, and why blood sugar can appear stubborn on a low-carb or fasting diet.

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Questions & Answers

Q: Why does the dawn phenomenon occur?

The dawn phenomenon occurs due to the body's natural response to waking up, where hormones like cortisol and adrenaline cause a rise in blood sugar to prepare for the day ahead.

Q: What is the difference between the dawn phenomenon and the Somogyi effect?

The dawn phenomenon occurs in everyone and is a normal rise in blood sugar before waking up, while the Somogyi effect only occurs in type 1 diabetics who have insufficient insulin to counteract the natural blood sugar increase.

Q: Why do diabetics and insulin-resistant individuals have a greater blood sugar response to the dawn phenomenon?

Diabetics and insulin-resistant individuals have cells that are less responsive to insulin, so the blood sugar levels tend to stay higher as the cells cannot efficiently absorb the increase.

Q: Why does blood sugar appear stubborn on a low-carb or fasting diet?

On a low-carb or fasting diet, blood sugar levels can remain stable or slightly elevated because the body is not receiving a large influx of carbohydrates that would trigger a significant insulin response. This is normal and indicates that the body is adapting to using fat and ketones for fuel instead of relying on glucose.

Summary & Key Takeaways

  • The dawn phenomenon is the natural rise in blood sugar that occurs before waking up, caused by hormones like cortisol and adrenaline.

  • Insulin resistance can lead to a greater blood sugar response, as the cells are less responsive to insulin.

  • The Somogyi effect is different from the dawn phenomenon and occurs in type 1 diabetics, where a low blood sugar drop is followed by a rebound spike due to a lack of insulin.

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