Introduction to cellular respiration | Cellular respiration | Biology | Khan Academy | Summary and Q&A

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December 9, 2009
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Introduction to cellular respiration | Cellular respiration | Biology | Khan Academy

TL;DR

Cellular respiration is the key biochemical reaction that converts glucose into energy, through three stages: glycolysis, the Krebs cycle, and the electron transport chain.

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Questions & Answers

Q: What is the main purpose of cellular respiration?

The main purpose of cellular respiration is to convert glucose into energy that can be utilized by the body for various functions, such as muscle contraction and nerve impulses.

Q: How does glycolysis contribute to cellular respiration?

Glycolysis is the first stage of cellular respiration and is responsible for breaking down glucose into two molecules of pyruvate. It generates a small amount of ATP and NADH, which are crucial for the subsequent stages of respiration.

Q: What is the difference between aerobic and anaerobic processes in cellular respiration?

Aerobic processes, such as the Krebs cycle and the electron transport chain, require oxygen to proceed. On the other hand, glycolysis is an anaerobic process that can occur with or without oxygen, but with oxygen it can proceed further to generate more energy.

Q: How are ATP and heat produced in cellular respiration?

ATP is the primary energy currency for cells, and cellular respiration generates ATP through the electron transport chain. However, some energy is also lost as heat, which is necessary for maintaining the correct temperature for cellular functions.

Summary & Key Takeaways

  • Cellular respiration is the process by which glucose is converted into energy and byproducts in our bodies.

  • Glucose, a 6-carbon molecule, undergoes glycolysis, where it is broken down into two 3-carbon molecules called pyruvate, producing 2 ATPs.

  • The pyruvate molecules then enter the Krebs cycle, generating an additional 2 ATPs.

  • The final stage is the electron transport chain, which uses NADH and FADH to produce 34 ATPs.

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