Biology Human Health & Diseases part 15 (Active & Passve Immunity, Humoral & CMI) class 12 XII | Summary and Q&A

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May 31, 2015
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Biology Human Health & Diseases part 15 (Active & Passve Immunity, Humoral & CMI) class 12 XII

TL;DR

This video discusses the different types of acquired immunity, including humoral immunity and cell-mediated immunity, as well as active and passive immunity.

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Questions & Answers

Q: What are the two types of acquired immunity?

The two types of acquired immunity are humoral immunity and cell-mediated immunity. Humoral immunity is controlled by antibody production by B cells, while cell-mediated immunity is mediated by T cells.

Q: How do B cells and T cells play a role in the immune response?

B cells are responsible for producing antibodies, while T cells can recognize antigens on infected cells and stimulate B cells to produce antibodies. T cells also play a role in activating other T cells and B cells.

Q: What is the difference between active and passive immunity?

Active immunity involves the production of antibodies in the host body when exposed to antigens, either naturally through disease or artificially through vaccination. Passive immunity, on the other hand, involves the injection of ready-made antibodies into the body.

Q: Can you give examples of active and passive immunity?

Examples of natural active immunity include not getting infected by a disease a second time and the production of antibodies in response to a pathogen. Artificial active immunity includes vaccination. Natural passive immunity involves the transfer of antibodies from mother to baby through breastfeeding or the placenta. Artificial passive immunity occurs when antibodies are injected into a person, such as in the case of rabies.

Summary & Key Takeaways

  • The video explains the two types of acquired immunity, humoral immunity and cell-mediated immunity, and discusses the role of B cells and T cells in the immune response.

  • It also describes active immunity, where antibodies are produced in the host body when exposed to antigens, and passive immunity, where ready-made antibodies are injected into the body.

  • The video provides examples of both natural and artificial active and passive immunity, including vaccines and the transfer of antibodies from mother to baby.

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