Loudest Bird in the World Screams at its Mate | SciShow News | Summary and Q&A

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October 26, 2019
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Loudest Bird in the World Screams at its Mate | SciShow News

TL;DR

The male Amazon white bellbird sets a new record for the loudest bird song, reaching volumes comparable to ambulances and thunder. Meanwhile, scientists have made progress in creating lab-grown meat that mimics the texture of real meat, potentially revolutionizing the livestock industry.

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Questions & Answers

Q: How loud is the Amazon white bellbird's song compared to other sounds?

The Amazon white bellbird's song can reach volumes of 125 decibels, which is equivalent to the sound of ambulances and thunder.

Q: What makes the bellbird able to produce such loud sounds?

The bellbird's thick ribs and abdominal muscles are believed to contribute to its ability to produce loud sounds.

Q: How did scientists measure the volume and study the anatomy of the bellbirds?

Scientists used advanced sound recording tools to precisely measure the volume of the bellbird's song. Video cameras were used to capture the relevant anatomy, such as breathing musculature and the shape of the throat.

Q: Why do male bellbirds sing loudly at females when it could harm their hearing?

The reason why male bellbirds sing loudly at females is still unclear. One possibility is that the females may be willing to endure the loudness to get a better look at their potential mate, suggesting that the loudness itself may be a signal of quality.

Q: What breakthrough has been made in lab-grown meat?

Scientists have managed to grow lab-grown meat that mimics the texture of real meat using a technique called scaffolding. This breakthrough brings us closer to a future where sustainable meat products can be produced without killing animals.

Q: Why is lab-grown meat considered a more sustainable alternative?

The livestock industry contributes to almost 15% of greenhouse emissions. Producing lab-grown meat in facilities would take up less land and emit much less CO2, making it a more environmentally friendly option.

Q: What challenges are there in the quest for lab-grown meat?

Lab-grown meat needs to not only taste like real meat but also have a similar texture when chewed. The texture of meat comes from the long, spindly muscle fibers that are difficult to mimic. Additionally, lab-grown meat may not have the same nutritional content as real meat.

Q: How was the texture of lab-grown meat achieved in the recent study?

Scientists used scaffolding, growing living cells on an edible gelatin scaffold. This technique allowed them to grow long, spindly muscle fibers similar to real meat. Mechanical testing confirmed the comparable texture, although the density of muscle fibers was different.

Summary & Key Takeaways

  • The Amazon white bellbird, found in the Amazon rainforest, has been discovered to produce the loudest bird song ever recorded, exceeding volumes of 125 decibels, similar to ambulances and thunder.

  • The bellbird's ability to produce loud sounds was attributed to its unusually thick ribs and abdominal muscles.

  • Scientists used advanced sound recording tools and video cameras to measure the volume and study the anatomy of the bellbirds. They found that these birds sing louder than larger mammals and achieve record-breaking loudness by opening their mouths widely and gulping air.

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