All About Canadian English and the Canadian English Accent! 🍁 (Compared Mostly to American English) | Summary and Q&A

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June 15, 2021
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Learn English with Bob the Canadian
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All About Canadian English and the Canadian English Accent! 🍁 (Compared Mostly to American English)

TL;DR

This video discusses the similarities and differences between Canadian English and American English pronunciation and vocabulary, emphasizing the unique Canadian accent and distinct words.

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Key Insights

  • 🏈 Canadian English and American English are very similar in terms of pronunciation, as they are classified together as North American English.
  • 👂 The "O" sound in some Canadian English words is pronounced differently compared to American English.
  • 😒 Canadians often use the word "eh" to prompt engagement or seek agreement from the listener.
  • 🏈 There are some spelling differences between Canadian English and American English, primarily in words like "honour" and "colour."
  • ⏫ Canadian English has unique words and phrases, such as "toque," "loonie," "double double," and "washroom."
  • 🍼 Canadians refer to a 24-bottle case of beer as a "two-four."
  • 💈 The term "hydro pole" is used in Canada instead of "utility pole."

Transcript

Do you see the river behind me? Sorry, it might be a little bit out of focus. The other day a man was out in his boat doing some fishing, but it was really hot, eh, so he didn't stay out there for very long and I think he only caught one or two fish. If you were paying close attention to those first few sentences I just said, you'll realize that I ... Read More

Questions & Answers

Q: What is the difference between Canadian English and American English pronunciation?

Canadian English and American English sound very similar, and even native English speakers struggle to distinguish the accents. However, Canadian English has unique pronunciations for certain words, such as the "O" sound in words like "boat" and "sorry."

Q: Why do Canadians use the word "eh"?

Canadians use the word "eh" in two ways. First, it is used as a prompt to ensure the listener is still paying attention. Second, it is used at the end of a statement to seek agreement from the listener. It is a distinct way Canadians engage with others.

Q: Are there spelling differences between Canadian English and American English?

There are some minor spelling differences. For example, Canadians use "OUR" instead of "OR" in words like "honour" and "colour." Additionally, some words like "centre" and "metre" are spelled with "RE" instead of "ER" in Canadian English.

Q: Are there any unique words or phrases in Canadian English?

Yes, there are a few words and phrases that are uniquely Canadian. Canadians use the word "toque" for a winter hat, "loonie" for a one-dollar coin, and "double double" when ordering coffee with two creams and two sugars. Additionally, terms like "washroom" instead of "bathroom" and "hydro pole" instead of "utility pole" are commonly used.

Q: What is the difference between Canadian English and American English pronunciation?

Canadian English and American English sound very similar, and even native English speakers struggle to distinguish the accents. However, Canadian English has unique pronunciations for certain words, such as the "O" sound in words like "boat" and "sorry."

More Insights

  • Canadian English and American English are very similar in terms of pronunciation, as they are classified together as North American English.

  • The "O" sound in some Canadian English words is pronounced differently compared to American English.

  • Canadians often use the word "eh" to prompt engagement or seek agreement from the listener.

  • There are some spelling differences between Canadian English and American English, primarily in words like "honour" and "colour."

  • Canadian English has unique words and phrases, such as "toque," "loonie," "double double," and "washroom."

  • Canadians refer to a 24-bottle case of beer as a "two-four."

  • The term "hydro pole" is used in Canada instead of "utility pole."

  • In Canadian English, the letter at the end of the alphabet is pronounced as "zed," not "zee."

Summary & Key Takeaways

  • Canadian English and American English sound very similar, as they are classified together as North American English.

  • Canadian English has different pronunciations for certain words, particularly in the way they say the "O" sound, such as in "boat" and "sorry."

  • Canadian English speakers often use the word "eh" as a prompt to keep the listener engaged or to seek agreement.

  • There are some spelling differences between Canadian English and American English, such as using "OUR" instead of "OR" in words like "honor" and "color."

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