The Viktor Frankl Achievement Paradox Silently Sabotages People's Lives. As long as you are aiming at happiness, you cannot obtain it. The more you make it a target, the more you miss the target. IF you focus less on achievement for yourself AND give yourself to a larger cause THEN the more good things happen to you AND the more you help others At that moment that you are no longer concerned with becoming a happy or a successful man or a woman, at that moment happiness installs itself by itself. You get from the world what you give to the world. Isn't it considerable that, instead, life expects something from you? Those inmates or prisoners were most likely to survive the camp period were: 1. Oriented toward a future 2. Orientated for becoming free again in the future 3. Oriented to a meaning that they had to fulfill the future, a task that they had to complete in the future, and/or to be reunited with their beloved people in the future, again (most important). Ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country. If you want to be massively successful, do NOT set ambitious goals, according to studies.

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Sep 11, 2023

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The Viktor Frankl Achievement Paradox Silently Sabotages People's Lives. As long as you are aiming at happiness, you cannot obtain it. The more you make it a target, the more you miss the target. IF you focus less on achievement for yourself AND give yourself to a larger cause THEN the more good things happen to you AND the more you help others At that moment that you are no longer concerned with becoming a happy or a successful man or a woman, at that moment happiness installs itself by itself. You get from the world what you give to the world. Isn't it considerable that, instead, life expects something from you? Those inmates or prisoners were most likely to survive the camp period were: 1. Oriented toward a future 2. Orientated for becoming free again in the future 3. Oriented to a meaning that they had to fulfill the future, a task that they had to complete in the future, and/or to be reunited with their beloved people in the future, again (most important). Ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country. If you want to be massively successful, do NOT set ambitious goals, according to studies.

"Behind Every Great Product - Silicon Valley Product Group". There are essentially three ways for a product manager to work, and I argue only one of them leads to success: They can escalate every issue and decision up to the CEO. In this model, the product manager is really a backlog administrator. Lots of CEO’s tell me this is the model they’re in and it’s not working. The product manager can do his or her job. They can call a meeting with all the stakeholders in the room and then just let them fight it out – this is design by committee and it rarely yields anything beyond mediocrity. The team quickly learned that while it may be a worthwhile objective to get to a common code base, it’s an empty victory if the product that results is not good. Moreover, users choose their devices and platforms because they value what’s different, not the same. From the customer’s point of view, they would rather wait a little longer and have a better platform-specific solution, than simultaneously ship a generic product on all platforms. They looked at things like when and how to load fonts since Mac users tended to have so many more than Windows users, and ensuring all Mac keyboard shortcuts still worked. People would rent once, and then quickly forget about the service, and didn’t seem very willing to change. The team knew that the service wasn’t better enough to get people to change. One of many tests they tried was to move to a subscription service. Get people to sign up for a month, and offer them unlimited movies. Would that be perceived as “better enough” to get them to change their media consumption behavior? So the product challenge became how were they going to make sure Netflix customers could watch a set of movies they would love, yet wouldn’t bankrupt the company? They knew they needed to somehow get customers to want a blend of expensive and less expensive titles. Necessity being the mother of invention, this is where the queue, the ratings system, and the recommendation engine all came from. Those were the technology-powered innovations that enabled the new, much more desirable business model. This was also a great example of a product manager needing to work across the entire company to come up with not just product solutions but business solutions that work. The core idea had support from Larry Page, but the idea immediately encountered some pretty strong resistance from both the ad sales team, and the engineering team. The new sales team, under Omid Kordistani, was off to a strong start selling keywords to large brands and placing the results at the top of the search results, highlighted as an ad, but still very prominent, much in the style that had been done in search results at other companies, including at Netscape where Omid came from. Sales was nervous that this idea of a self-service advertising platform would diminish the value of what the sales team was trying to sell. And the engineers, which had been working so hard to provide highly relevant search results, were understandably very worried that users would be confused and frustrated by ads getting in the way of their search results. Once Jane understood the constraints and concerns she was able to advocate for a solution that she believed would address the issues yet enable countless small businesses to get a much more effective advertising solution. This is yet another example of how there are always so many good reasons for products not to get built. In the products that succeed, there is always someone like Jane behind the scenes working to get over each and every one of the objections, be they technical or business or anything else. One such early possibility she found were city center venues that had these large electronic billboard screens that were capable of video. But she observed that these venues were just playing the same thing you could watch on your television at home, even though the context and audience was very different. So Alex proposed a series of experiments where she would have editorial teams assemble specific tailored content suitable for specific venues and audiences, and then she would measure the audience reach and engagement. This work ended up fueling a dramatic shift at the BBC from broadcast content to content distribution, and this work dramatically impacted reach, and soon became the basis for BBC’s Mobile efforts. Today more than 50 million people around the world depend on BBC’s mobile offering every week. Especially as she was there during the years moving from the iTunes original DRM-based music, to DRM-free, was critical in helping iTunes to become truly mass market. Moving beyond early adopters into mass market involved many different efforts, some product, some marketing, and some a blend of the two. A good example of this blend was the relationship the iTunes team engaged with the American Idol program. Apple saw in this an opportunity to expose an ideal target market to the power of iTunes and digital music. Not just by selling the music from the contestants featured on the show, but by making iTunes an integral part of consumer’s life. The integration also allowed the team to target a very specific persona, and work to drive up engagement with this group. One of the keys was to make it easy to get to iTunes for those that didn’t yet have the app installed. One of the absolute hardest assignments in our industry is to try to cause dramatic change in a large and successful company. It’s actually easier in many ways if the company is in serious trouble and they are feeling big pain, because that pain can be used to motivate the change. She had helped Adobe to build a very large and successful business for itself – on the order of $2B in annual license revenue – with its desktop–based Creative Suite. But Lea knew the market was changing, and the company needed to move from the old desktop-centric, annual upgrade model, to a subscription-based model supporting all the devices designers were now using – including tablets and mobile in all their many form factors. With over a million customers of the existing Creative Suite, Lea understood the technology adoption curve, and that there would be a segment of the customer base that would strongly resist a change of this magnitude. Lea understood that it’s not just about whether the new Creative Cloud would be “better,” it would also be different in some meaningful ways, and some people would need more time to digest this change than others. Lea knew she had a tough job in front of her and her teams. She realized that in order for all of these inter-related pieces to be able to move together in parallel, she needed to very clearly articulate a compelling vision of the new whole as greater than the sum of the parts. It is easy to see how big companies with lots of revenue at risk would hesitate to make the changes they need to not only survive, but thrive. Lea tackled these concerns and more head on with a clear and compelling vision and strategy, and clear and continuous communication to the many stakeholders. Product Management is absolutely distinct from the other disciplines. The role I would argue that the product manager is most similar to is the role of the CEO. But with the obvious difference that unlike the CEO, nobody reports to the product manager. Like a CEO, the Product Manager must deeply understand all aspects of the business. The Product Manager needs to ensure a business outcome, not just ensure a product gets defined. I hoped you noticed that in literally every one of these examples, the winning solutions didn’t come from users or sales; rather great products require an intense collaboration with design and engineering to solve real problems for our users and customers, in ways that meet the needs of your business. Like a successful CEO, the successful product manager must be the very best versions of smart, creative and persistent. By smart I mean using new technologies to reach new audiences or enable new business models. By creative, I mean thinking outside the normal product box of features to solve business problems. And persistent — as in pushing companies way beyond their comfort zone with compelling evidence, constant communication and building bridges across functions in the face of stubborn resistance. Being a great product manager means having extraordinary grit. Finally, I hope you can see that true leadership is a big part of what separates the great product people from the merely good ones. So no matter your title or level, if you aspire to be great, don’t be afraid to lead.

Actionable Advice:

  • 1. Focus less on your own achievements and give yourself to a larger cause. The more you help others, the more good things will happen to you.
  • 2. Instead of setting ambitious goals, focus on fulfilling a meaningful purpose or task in the future. Orient yourself towards a future that you want to create.
  • 3. To be a successful product manager, collaborate intensely with design and engineering teams to solve real problems for users and customers. Be smart, creative, and persistent in pushing for change and

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