Stanford engineers to Colbert: Spider-Man is plausible | Summary and Q&A

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January 27, 2016
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Stanford engineers to Colbert: Spider-Man is plausible

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Summary

Stephen Colbert mentioned on his show that a new study from Cambridge University suggests that Spider-Man should not be able to climb walls. He stated that according to the study, the largest animal capable of climbing should be a gecko. However, Sanford disproves this by demonstrating how humans can climb glass walls by distributing their weight cleverly.

Questions & Answers

Q: What did Stephen Colbert say about Spider-Man's ability to climb walls?

According to the video, Stephen Colbert claimed that Spider-Man's ability to climb walls has been debunked by a study from Cambridge University.

Q: What did the study from Cambridge University suggest?

The study from Cambridge University suggests that, based on their calculations, Spider-Man should not possess the ability to climb walls. It claims that the largest animal capable of climbing should be a gecko.

Q: How did Sanford disprove the study from Cambridge University?

Sanford disproves the study by demonstrating that humans can climb glass walls by cleverly distributing their weight. They use a device that allows them to climb using a 45 pound weight as an example.

Q: Is Sanford suggesting that Spider-Man is plausible?

Yes, Sanford claims that Spider-Man's ability to climb walls is plausible based on their experiment with humans climbing glass walls. They argue that if you are clever about weight distribution, climbing walls is indeed possible.

Q: What evidence did Sanford present to support their claim?

Sanford's evidence is the demonstration where they show a person successfully climbing a glass wall using a device and clever weight distribution. They argue that this proves Spider-Man's climbing abilities are achievable.

Q: What is Sanford's approach to climbing walls?

Sanford proposes that instead of directly copying the gecko's climbing mechanism, humans can use clever weight distribution to climb walls. They utilize a device to distribute their weight and climb glass walls successfully.

Q: How does Sanford's method with weight distribution differ from the gecko's climbing ability?

Sanford's method is different from the gecko's climbing ability because they do not directly imitate the gecko's mechanism. They instead use a device and distribute their weight cleverly, allowing them to climb walls successfully, including glass walls.

Q: What benefits are there to Sanford's approach?

Sanford's approach to climbing walls has the benefit of proving Spider-Man's climbing abilities as plausible. It also demonstrates that with the right technique and weight distribution, humans can climb walls, providing potential applications in various fields such as architecture and sports.

Q: How did Sanford respond to Stephen Colbert's statement regarding Spider-Man?

Sanford responded to Stephen Colbert's statement by disproving the claim made in the study from Cambridge University. They provided evidence through a demonstration of humans successfully climbing glass walls using their method, which supports Spider-Man's ability to climb walls.

Q: What was Stephen Colbert's initial claim about Spider-Man?

Stephen Colbert claimed that a study from Cambridge University suggests that Spider-Man should not have the ability to climb walls, and instead, the largest animal capable of climbing should be a gecko.

Takeaways

In conclusion, Sanford offers a compelling demonstration that counters the study from Cambridge University and supports Spider-Man's climbing abilities. Through clever weight distribution and the use of a climbing device, humans can climb glass walls successfully. This approach challenges the notion that only animals like geckos should possess the ability to climb vertical surfaces. The experiment opens up possibilities for various practical applications and highlights the importance of considering alternative methods when debunking scientific claims.

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