Ori Brafman: The Skills of High Self-Monitors | Summary and Q&A

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May 10, 2011
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Stanford eCorner
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Ori Brafman: The Skills of High Self-Monitors

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Summary

In this video, the speaker discusses the concept of high self-monitors who have a natural ability to form instant connections with others. The speaker introduces Dina Caplin as an example of someone who naturally connects with people, and a Stanford researcher who studied what makes people like Dina able to form these connections. The researcher conducted a questionnaire to determine if people find it hard to imitate others' behavior, have trouble adapting their behavior to suit different situations, and if they can make impromptu speeches. Dina, being a high self-monitor, answered no to the first three questions and yes to the last question. It is not that high self-monitors are being fake or ingenious, but rather they naturally meet others where they are, mirroring their behavior. The speaker also discusses how high self-monitors tend to change jobs more frequently after graduation but are more successful and have higher positions due to their ability to network effectively.

Questions & Answers

Q: What is the main trait of high self-monitors?

The main trait of high self-monitors is their natural ability to form instant connections with others.

Q: Who is an example of a high self-monitor mentioned in the video?

Dina Caplin is mentioned as an example of a high self-monitor who naturally connects with people.

Q: How did the Stanford researcher study people like Dina?

The researcher conducted a questionnaire asking participants if they find it hard to imitate others' behavior, if they have trouble adapting their behavior to suit different situations, and if they can make impromptu speeches.

Q: How would Dina have answered these questions?

Dina would have answered no to the first three questions and yes to the last question, indicating her ability to naturally adapt her behavior and make impromptu speeches.

Q: What is the reason high self-monitors are able to form connections with others?

High self-monitors naturally meet others where they are and mirror their behavior, creating a sense of natural connection.

Q: What is the outcome for high self-monitors in terms of their careers?

High self-monitors tend to change jobs more frequently after graduation but are more successful, making more money and reaching higher positions in less time.

Q: Why do high self-monitors change jobs more frequently?

High self-monitors change jobs more frequently because they are often getting promoted rapidly, leading to different job offers.

Q: What is the difference in network positioning between high self-monitors and normal people?

High self-monitors tend to be in the center of networks, whereas it takes an average person 18 years to reach the center.

Q: How long does it take for a high self-monitor to reach the center of a network?

A high self-monitor can achieve the center of a network within 13 months, while it takes a normal person approximately 18 years.

Q: What is the main advantage of high self-monitors in networking?

The advantage of high self-monitors in networking is their ability to mirror themselves into different situations, allowing for more fluid interactions and connections.

Takeaways

The video highlights the natural ability of high self-monitors to form instant connections with others by mirroring their behavior. These individuals tend to be successful in their careers, as they are able to position themselves in the center of networks and quickly advance. By adapting their behavior to suit various situations, high self-monitors can achieve higher positions and success in a shorter period of time compared to others.

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