Electric Generators, Induced EMF, Electromagnetic Induction - Physics | Summary and Q&A

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December 22, 2017
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The Organic Chemistry Tutor
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Electric Generators, Induced EMF, Electromagnetic Induction - Physics

TL;DR

This video focuses on solving physics problems related to electric generators, including calculating the angular speed, peak output voltage, rms voltage, rms current, and power dissipation of the generator.

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Key Insights

  • ๐Ÿคจ The angular speed of an AC generator can be calculated by multiplying 2 pi by the frequency.
  • ๐Ÿ™Š The peak output voltage of an AC generator can be determined using the formula nba times omega.
  • โšก The rms voltage produced by the generator can be found by dividing the peak voltage by the square root of two.
  • ๐Ÿค’ The rms current flowing in a resistor connected to the generator can be calculated by dividing the rms voltage by the resistance.
  • โœŠ Power dissipated by the resistor can be determined using the formula i squared times r.
  • ๐Ÿคจ The angular speed of an AC generator can be converted from rpm to radians per second by multiplying by 2 pi and dividing by 60.
  • ๐Ÿคจ The frequency of an AC generator can be calculated by dividing the angular speed by 2 pi.

Transcript

in this video we're going to focus on solving some common physics problems associated with electric generators so in this problem we have a 60 hertz ac generator and this generator has a coil with an area of 5 times 10 to the minus 3 square meters and the number of loops is 500 and we're given the strength of the magnetic field inside this generato... Read More

Questions & Answers

Q: How can we calculate the angular speed of an AC generator?

The angular speed of an AC generator can be calculated using the formula 2 pi f, where f is the frequency of the generator (in this case, 60 Hz). Therefore, the angular speed would be approximately 377 radians per second.

Q: What is the peak output voltage of the generator?

To calculate the peak output voltage, we can use the formula nba times omega, where n is the number of loops (given as 1500), b is the strength of the magnetic field (0.10 Tesla), a is the area of the coil (5 times 10 to the power of -3 square meters), and omega is the angular speed (377 radians per second). The result is 282.75 volts.

Q: How can we calculate the rms voltage produced by the generator?

The rms voltage is equal to the peak voltage divided by the square root of two. Using the peak output voltage calculated previously (282.75 volts), dividing it by the square root of two, results in an rms voltage of approximately 199.9 volts.

Q: What is the rms current flowing in a 50-ohm resistor connected to the generator?

The rms current can be calculated by dividing the rms voltage (199.9 volts) generated by the generator by the resistance (50 ohms) across it. This gives an rms current of approximately 3.998 amps, which can be rounded to 4 amps.

Summary & Key Takeaways

  • The video discusses how to calculate the angular speed of an AC generator based on the frequency, area of the coil, number of loops, and strength of the magnetic field.

  • It explains how to determine the peak output voltage of an AC generator by using the formula nba times omega, where n is the number of loops, b is the strength of the magnetic field, a is the area of the coil, and omega is the angular speed.

  • The video also covers how to calculate the rms voltage produced by the generator by dividing the peak voltage by the square root of two.

  • Additionally, it provides instructions on calculating the rms current flowing in a resistor when connected to the generator and determines the power dissipated by the resistor using the formula i squared times r.

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