Dave Evans: Designing the Life You Really Want [Entire Talk] | Summary and Q&A

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March 1, 2017
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Stanford eCorner
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Dave Evans: Designing the Life You Really Want [Entire Talk]

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Summary

In this video, the speaker discusses how design thinking can be applied to designing your life. He explains that the Life Design Lab aims to use the principles of design thinking to tackle the challenge of designing one's life after university. The speaker addresses common dysfunctional beliefs and misconceptions about finding one's passion, being the best version of oneself, and knowing what you want to do in life. He introduces the concept of ideating multiple futures and using prototypes to test and learn from different possibilities. The speaker emphasizes the importance of curiosity, collaboration, reframing, bias towards action, and being mindful of the design process when designing your life.

Questions & Answers

Q: What is the mission of the Life Design Lab?

The mission of the Life Design Lab is to apply the innovation principles of design thinking to help individuals design their lives after university.

Q: What is a dysfunctional belief about finding one's passion?

A dysfunctional belief about finding one's passion is the idea that there must be a singular, predetermined passion that determines one's life path. The speaker argues that passion is the outcome, not the starting point, and that it is not a universal organizing principle for all individuals.

Q: What are the five mindsets emphasized in life design?

The five mindsets emphasized in life design are curiosity, radical collaboration, reframing, bias toward action, and being mindful of the design process. These mindsets are helpful for approaching life design with an open mind, exploring different possibilities, and taking action.

Q: What is the purpose of ideating multiple futures?

Ideating multiple futures allows individuals to explore different versions of themselves and their lives. By doing so, they can generate more ideas, perspectives, and possibilities for their future paths.

Q: How can prototypes be used in life design?

Prototypes in life design can take the form of conversations or experiences. For example, conducting life design interviews with people in desired fields or trying out different activities or roles. Prototypes help individuals learn, gather feedback, and gain insights about potential futures before fully committing to them.

Q: What is the speaker's view on being the best version of oneself?

The speaker challenges the idea of being the best version of oneself by highlighting that there is not just one best self. He argues that individuals contain multiple versions of themselves and that pursuing a singular best self can limit one's perspective and happiness.

Q: What is the significance of the concept of accepting where you are?

Accepting where you are is an important mindset in the design thinking process because it allows individuals to start their life design journey from a place of self-acceptance and understanding. It encourages individuals to embrace their current circumstances and challenges and build a future from that starting point.

Q: How can design thinking be applied to the challenge of designing one's life?

Design thinking can be applied to designing one's life by approaching it with curiosity, reframing challenges, prototyping different futures, collaborating with others, and taking action. By using design thinking principles and mindsets, individuals can better navigate the complexities and uncertainties of life design.

Q: What is the difference between design prototypes and engineering prototypes?

Design prototypes are early-stage prototypes used to learn and gather feedback, while engineering prototypes are often late-stage prototypes used to prove the effectiveness of a concept. Design prototypes focus on cheap, fast experimentation and learning, whereas engineering prototypes focus on validating and refining a concept before market release.

Q: How does the speaker address the fear of missing out (FOMO) in life design?

The speaker addresses the fear of missing out by highlighting that individuals have multiple lives within them and that it is impossible to experience everything. By recognizing that there are always more possibilities and choices than one can pursue, individuals can focus on the futures that align with their values and priorities.

Takeaways

Design thinking can be an effective approach to designing one's life. By embracing mindsets such as curiosity, collaboration, reframing, bias toward action, and being mindful of the design process, individuals can navigate the complexities and uncertainties of life design. Ideating multiple futures and using prototypes, such as conversations and experiences, can help individuals explore different possibilities, gather feedback, and make informed decisions about their life paths. It is important to challenge dysfunctional beliefs, such as the notion of finding one's singular passion or being the best version of oneself, and to accept where one is currently in order to effectively design one's life.

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