Tods Gothic mace - hitting armour | Summary and Q&A

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January 20, 1970
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Tod's Workshop
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Tods Gothic mace - hitting armour

TL;DR

This analysis examines a late 15th century flanged Gothic mace, discussing its construction, purpose, and effectiveness in combat.

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Questions & Answers

Q: How was the late 15th century mace constructed?

The mace had a solid steel shaft and a flanged head that was brazed onto a hexagonal collar. The flanges were then slipped into the collar and topped with a cap.

Q: How were the flanges attached to the mace?

The flanges were brazed into position with copper, which allowed the mace head to be hardened by heating and tempering it after brazing. Some pieces were tack welded before brazing.

Q: Were these maces effective against armor?

These maces were not designed for armor penetration. They concentrated the force of the blow, making them effective against items like mail, which could not resist the weight of the blow.

Q: How did the mace perform against a 15th-century breastplate?

The mace left a big dent in a variable thickness breastplate made of mild steel. While it did not penetrate the armor, it demonstrated that concentrated force in the right areas could cause significant damage.

Summary & Key Takeaways

  • The late 15th century flanged Gothic mace is a relatively lightweight weapon, weighing about 860 grams, or under two pounds.

  • The mace's handle is made of solid steel, with a flanged head that is attached through brazing and potentially screwing.

  • These maces were not designed for armor penetration but rather as force concentrators, concentrating the energy of the blow to cause maximum damage.

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