There, their, and they're | Frequently confused words | Usage | Grammar | Summary and Q&A

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March 4, 2017
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Khan Academy
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There, their, and they're | Frequently confused words | Usage | Grammar

TL;DR

This video explains the distinctions between there, their, and they're, providing examples and tips for proper usage.

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Questions & Answers

Q: What is the difference between "there," "their," and "they're"?

"There" is used to indicate location, "their" shows ownership by a group, and "they're" is a contraction of "they are."

Q: Can "there" be used as an adjective?

Yes, "there" can also function as an adjective when it modifies a noun, such as in the phrase "there is my dog."

Q: How do I determine which one to use in a sentence?

Ask yourself if the word answers the question "where is it?" (use "there"), "who does it belong to?" (use "their"), or if it is a contraction of "they are" (use "they're").

Q: Can "they're" and "they are" be used interchangeably?

Yes, both "they're" and "they are" are grammatically correct, but "they're" is a shorter and more efficient option.

Summary & Key Takeaways

  • "There" is an adverb and adjective used to indicate location.

  • "Their" is a possessive determiner that shows ownership by a group.

  • "They're" is a contraction of "they are" and can be used interchangeably in most cases.

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