Ken Belkin Talks Adrian Loya Trial on LawNewz Network | Summary and Q&A

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September 6, 2017
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Law&Crime Network
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Ken Belkin Talks Adrian Loya Trial on LawNewz Network

TL;DR

Doctor testifies that Adrian Loya, accused of murder, may not have been criminally culpable due to mental illness.

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Questions & Answers

Q: Why did the prosecution call the doctor as a witness?

The prosecution brought the doctor to comply with Brady V Maryland, which requires the disclosure of exculpatory evidence that indicates the defendant's innocence. The doctor's analysis suggested Loya may not have been criminally culpable due to his mental illness.

Q: If the doctor's testimony supports the defense's theory, why would the defense cross-examine him?

The defense may choose not to extensively cross-examine the doctor to avoid damaging his testimony. They can leverage his conclusions to support their argument of Loya's lack of criminal culpability and thank him for his helpful testimony.

Q: Can Asperger's or autism be used to prove the legal definition of insanity?

While people with autism or Asperger's may know if they are doing something wrong, the defense may argue that certain crimes, when committed by individuals with these conditions, indicate a lack of understanding the difference between right and wrong. However, it is not commonly used in courts to prove insanity.

Q: How does the defense plan to counter the doctor's testimony?

The defense is likely to call their own experts to present a different medical opinion. The jury will have to analyze and weigh the credibility of each expert's conclusions to determine who is right.

Summary & Key Takeaways

  • A doctor's testimony in the Adrian Loya trial suggests that Loya may not have been criminally responsible for his actions due to a mental health defect.

  • The prosecution called the doctor as a witness to comply with Brady V Maryland, a Supreme Court case stating exculpatory evidence must be disclosed by the prosecution.

  • The doctor concluded that Loya suffered from Asperger's but could not appreciate the difference between right and wrong, challenging the notion that Loya had a delusional or criminal personality disorder.

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