Acidic, Basic, and Neutral Salts - Ionic Compounds | Summary and Q&A

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June 30, 2020
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Acidic, Basic, and Neutral Salts - Ionic Compounds

TL;DR

Learn how to identify whether an ionic compound or salt is acidic, basic, or neutral based on the properties of its constituent ions.

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Questions & Answers

Q: What are the characteristics of a strong acid?

Strong acids like hydrochloric acid completely ionize in water, resulting in a high concentration of H+ ions. They have higher acidic properties compared to weak acids.

Q: How does the number of oxygen atoms affect the acidity of oxyacids?

The fewer oxygen atoms present in an oxyacid, the less acidic it will be. For example, nitric acid (HNO3) is a strong acid, but nitrous acid (HNO2) is considered a weak acid.

Q: Is the chloride ion neutral or basic?

The chloride ion is neutral because it is the conjugate base of a strong acid (hydrochloric acid). It does not affect the pH of a solution when dissolved.

Q: What are some examples of basic ions?

Some basic ions include fluoride (conjugate base of a weak acid), hydroxide (strong base), acetate (conjugate base of a weak acid), and carbonate (weak acid conjugate base).

Summary & Key Takeaways

  • Strong acids completely ionize in water, while weak acids partially ionize.

  • The number of oxygen atoms in oxyacids affects their acidity, with fewer oxygen atoms resulting in less acidity.

  • The conjugate base of a strong acid is neutral, while the conjugate base of a weak acid is a weak base.

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