5 Day Reading Challenge in November 2022 📚✨

5 Day Reading Challenge

Day 1️⃣

  1. How to Make Sure You Keep Growing and Learning by Susan J. Ashford (8 mins)

    Small, everyday experiments can help us reach our goals and get better at the skills that are important to us. Leaders who are widely viewed as effective and highly successful in their organizations will tell you that 70% of the learning that got them there was through their experiences, 20% was through other people, and 10% was through courses, books, and other types of education.

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  1. How to cure Highlight Dementia by Cortex Futura (3 mins)

    If you go back through your highlights and you’re like “whaaa…why did I highlight this, this is useless?!”, then you should suffer from Highlight Dementia. In this article, the author advises two methods to cure it.

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  1. Efficiency is the Enemy by FS Blog (8 mins)

    DeMarco defines slack as “the degree of freedom required to effect change. Slack is the natural enemy of efficiency and efficiency is the natural enemy of slack.” This article gives us insights to notice what we do for the better.

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Day 2️⃣

  1. 2 tricks will help you learn and remember new stuff by Rachel Cramer (3 mins)

    Combining two strategies—spacing and retrieval practice—is key to success in learning, says Shana Carpenter. The benefits of spacing and retrieval practice have been confirmed over and over in studies in labs, classrooms, and workplaces, but these two techniques haven’t fully caught on.

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  1. The 100-Hour Rule: Forgotten Study Shows How You Can Become World-Class In 100 Hours by Michael Simmons (12 mins)

    Someone could become the best at a skill in just 100 sessions — approximately 100 hours. This would seem to challenge the fundamental idea behind the 10,000-Hour Rule — the pattern that it often takes 10,000 hours of deliberate practice to become world-class at something. So, what should we do to achieve it?

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  1. Slow-Reading is The New Deep Learning by David Handel, MD (15 mins)

    Speed-reading is for skimmers. Slow-reading is for scholars. Research paper after research paper has concluded that as reading speed goes up as a result of effortful speed-reading, comprehension goes down. If you’re reading to learn, you need to engage with the content and associate the new concepts with your existing knowledge.

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Day 3️⃣

  1. Variability, Not Repetition, is the Key to Mastery by Scott H. Young (6 mins)

    Variability plays an essential and oft-neglected role in mastering complex skills. Considerable research shows that practicing in varied contexts with varied methods and performing with varied task constraints results in more robust learning than simple repetition.

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  1. Lifelong Learning by FS Blog (5 mins)

    People need to learn continuously. Even if your daily learning is small, it is significant when you continuously learn throughout your life. Resolving to learn continuously in your entire life is remarkably powerful and makes a big difference in the long run.

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  1. Warren Buffett’s 5/25 Rule Will Help You Focus On The Things That Really Matter by Louis Chew (4 mins)

    Your odds of success improve when you direct your focus to a singular pursuit. You have to double down on a few things and rack up the hours trying to get really good at that. Rather than add on, take the time to eliminate. The 5/25 rule is an example of how simplicity makes life better and easier.

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Day 4️⃣

  1. Cumulative vs. Cyclical Knowledge by Morgan Housel (4 mins)

    In some fields, our knowledge is seamlessly passed down across generations. In others, it’s fleeting. To paraphrase investor Jim Grant: Knowledge in some fields is cumulative. In other fields it’s cyclical (at best). I think there are a few reasons this happens, and what it means we have to accept.

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  1. While most people fight to learn “in-demand” skills, smart people are learning rare skills instead by Michael Simmons (14 mins)

    Amateur learners focus on popularity as a proxy for value and ignore rarity. They look for in-demand skills. With poor skill selection, we drown in the sea of humanity’s knowledge. All of the effort we spend learning and applying what we learn are muted at best or wasted at worst. On the other hand, if we master the ability to select skills, then just 100 hours of learning could have a life-changing impact.

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  1. Why Facts Don’t Change Our Minds by James Clear (8 mins)

    "Humans need a reasonably accurate view of the world in order to survive. If your model of reality is wildly different from the actual world, then you struggle to take effective actions each day. However, truth and accuracy are not the only things that matter to the human mind. Humans also seem to have a deep desire to belong."

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Day 5️⃣

  1. The default effect: why we renounce our ability to choose by Anne-Laure Le Cunff (5 mins)

    Why is it that we like having choices, but we don’t like choosing? Being able to decide between several options makes us feel in control. Yet, we tend to exhibit a preference for the default option when presented with a selection of choices. This is called the default effect, and it rules many aspects of our lives from the products we buy to the career we build.

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  1. what they don’t teach at university, but should by Harold Jarche (2 mins)

    It’s hard to learn things alone and people can accelerate learning by studying with mentors, fellow seekers, or knowledge catalysts. We’re living in a network society, so we can find these people and we should do it. These skills are portable and help you continue and accelerate your learning.

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  1. Inversion: The Crucial Thinking Skill Nobody Ever Taught You by James Clear (6 mins)

    The way of thinking, in which you consider the opposite of what you want, is known as inversion. It is a rare and crucial skill that nearly all great thinkers use to their advantage and is a powerful thinking tool because it puts a spotlight on errors and roadblocks that are not obvious at first glance. Instead of asking how to do something, ask how to not do it.

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