5 Day Reading Challenge in July 2022 📚✨

5 Day Reading Challenge

Day 1️⃣

  1. The Feynman Learning Technique by FS Blog (19min)

    Knowing something is valuable. The more you understand how the world works, the more options you have for dealing with the unexpected and the better you can create and capitalize on opportunities. The Feynman Learning Technique is a great method to develop mastery over sets of information. Once you do, the knowledge becomes a powerful tool at your disposal.

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  1. Time management: do the things you actually want to do by Anne-Laure Le Cunff (6min)

    To achieve our goals, we need to be smart about how we allocate our time to different tasks and activities. What is urgent now is often different from what is truly important. Time management is not just about managing your calendar. It’s also about managing your energy levels, your relationships, and much more. So how do you manage your time efficiently so you can achieve what matters to you while attending to your responsibilities?

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  1. If You Commit to Nothing, You’ll Be Distracted By Everything by James Clear (4min)

    If you have something that is important to you, then eliminate the unrelated and unimportant tasks, get started no matter how big the challenge, and commit to your goal. If you commit to nothing, then you’ll find that it’s easy to be distracted by everything. Every big challenge has a turning point. Today could be your Day of Commitment.

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Day 2️⃣

  1. Fail like a scientist by Anne-Laure Le Cunff (5min)

    Everything is an experiment, every failure is a learning opportunity. So, focus on progress over success. Success can be elusive and some of the most ambitious projects may take a long time to come to fruition. Even scientific experiments are not designed to succeed. They are designed to explore a question, and potentially increase knowledge of a problem. To fail like a scientist is to embrace the experimental nature of life.

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  1. How to Get Your Brain to Focus on What Matters by James Clear (4min)

    The idea that you can focus on one part of an experience and ignore others is a cognitive psychology concept known as selective attention. Selective attention helps you filter out the noise and focus on the signal. The only way to figure out what works and what doesn't is to measure your results. If you repeat this cycle for 20 years, then you end up becoming very good at focusing on the things that matter and ignoring the things that don't.

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  1. The Jeff Bezos Hockey Stick Rule: If a technology is growing exponentially, don’t blow the opportunity like most do by Michael Simmons (11min)

    When confronted with big new technology, tool, or other change in the world that is growing exponentially, should we copy Bezos and go all in or stick to our knitting? I call this the Jeff Bezos Dilemma. It’s particularly important for all of us to have a solution to this dilemma because it impacts every area of our life, could change the trajectory of our life and is particularly timely in today’s world.

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Day 3️⃣

  1. Why You Should Stop Reading News by FS Blog (5min)

    We spend hours consuming news because we want to be informed. The problem is news doesn’t make us informed. In fact, the more news we consume the more misinformed we become. Rarely do we stop to ask ourselves questions about the media we consume: Is this good for me? Is this important? Asking questions makes it clear the news isn’t good for you.

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  1. Why Tacit Knowledge is More Important Than Deliberate Practice by Cedric Chin (15min)

    Understanding that tacit knowledge exists is one of the most useful things you can have happen to you. Once you understand that tacit knowledge exists, you will begin to see that big parts of any skill tree is tacit in nature, which means that you can go hunting for it, which in turn means you can start to ask really useful question when it comes to expertise, which is: that person has it; that person is really good at it; how can I have it too?

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  1. Overrated vs. Underrated: Common Beliefs We Get Wrong by James Clear (4min)

    As a society, we often overvalue unimportant things and undervalue the ideas and strategies that make a real difference. Here’s the author's take on a few common beliefs that I think we often get wrong. Overrated: Being busy. Underrated: Doing one thing at a time.

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Day 4️⃣

  1. Cognitive bottlenecks: the inherent limits of the thinking mind by Anne-Laure Le Cunff (5min)

    The “thinking mind” is the part of the mind that seeks to make sense of the world; it analyses situations, imagines scenarios, evaluates solutions, and tells stories. It’s an inherent aspect of what makes us human. However, it’s limited by multiple cognitive bottlenecks. Two big bad bottlenecks are our attention and our working memory. So what exactly can you do to deal with these limitations?

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  1. Learning Speed: What Jeff Bezos, Elon Musk, And Bill Gates Know That Most People Don’t by Michael Simmons (18min)

    Most people play popular games — games with predefined boundaries that are played in crowded sandboxes. Popular games are often those with the most short-term, concrete rewards. The world’s top innovators, like Elon Musk, Bill Gates, Warren Buffett, and Jeff Bezos, however, play hidden games, which are played in sandboxes that people don’t even realize exist, have a higher return, and are more long-term and abstract.

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  1. You’re Only As Good As Your Worst Day by FS Blog (4min)

    It’s easy to look good when everything goes according to plan and circumstances are calm. Anyone can succeed for a while, even if it’s just out of pure luck. Like companies, investors might be able to perform well in ideal conditions due to luck. But when the market crashes and there’s blood in the streets, very few will know how to cope or be prepared. Because what you do on your worst day is impossible to fake. It’s honest signaling. You’re only as good as your worst day.

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Day 5️⃣

  1. Bezos, Musk, & Buffett See The World Differently, Because They See Time Differently by Michael Simmons (16min)

    Where almost all public company CEOs, not to mention people in general, plan days, weeks, and months ahead, these visionaries think decades or even centuries into the future. And they don’t just plan: They put their money where their mouths are. They make bold bets that won’t pay off anytime soon — and that have a high probability of failure. Playing the long game is actually a universally powerful and foundational life and business strategy that we should all adopt.

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  1. From note-taking to note-making by Anne-Laure Le Cunff (5min)

    Note-taking has played an important role in human history. So far, many different note-taking systems have been devised over the years. But most of them do not result in better recall. To capture, understand, and remember what we study, we need to understand the difference between “note-taking” and “note-making” and engage actively. Instead of just ingurgitating whatever you are studying, proactively use your own language and create your own systems.

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  1. Illusion of Transparency: Your Poker Face is Better Than You Think by FS Blog (7min)

    We tend to think that people can easily tell what we’re thinking and feeling. But they can’t. Most of the time, other people can’t correctly guess what we’re thinking or feeling. The gap between our subjective experience and what other people pick up on is known as the illusion of transparency. If you want someone to know your mental state, you need to tell them in the clearest terms possible. You can’t make assumptions.

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