Curating content has become an essential part of our digital age. With the abundance of information available, curators help us navigate through the vast web and discover valuable content. However, despite their influence and the value they provide, curators often don't reap the financial benefits of their ecosystem directly. This is because they don't own their content, data, or relationships with their followers, creating a lock-in effect for the platform they started on.

Glasp

Glasp

Sep 18, 20235 min read

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Curating content has become an essential part of our digital age. With the abundance of information available, curators help us navigate through the vast web and discover valuable content. However, despite their influence and the value they provide, curators often don't reap the financial benefits of their ecosystem directly. This is because they don't own their content, data, or relationships with their followers, creating a lock-in effect for the platform they started on.

To understand the complete picture of marketing, it's essential to move beyond traditional definitions of growth and integrate the three domains of marketing: brand marketing, growth marketing, and product marketing. Brand marketing tells the story of why an organization exists, creating meaningful and emotional connections with customers. It increases awareness, captures new customers, and reinforces the brand promise at every touchpoint in the customer lifecycle.

On the other hand, product marketing focuses on delivering that brand promise. It involves aspects such as packaging, pricing, and making features accessible and understandable to users. It ensures that the organization's offerings align with the expectations set by brand marketing.

Meanwhile, growth marketing plays a crucial role in acquiring and retaining customers. It utilizes triggers, channels, messaging, and personalization to bring customers into the product and keep them engaged. However, it's important to note that changes in one domain will impact the others. If the growth marketing strategy brings in new customers, but the product fails to deliver on the brand promise, those customers will ultimately churn.

To create a successful marketing strategy, it's crucial to sequence the changes in each domain to have a compounding impact. Marketing teams that operate in silos often struggle to integrate these different pieces effectively. By aligning the strategies of brand marketing, growth marketing, and product marketing, organizations can create less brittle strategies that work harmoniously to achieve their goals.

Furthermore, proactivity is essential because changes in each domain happen over different time horizons. While growth marketing performance can be measured quickly, product and brand marketing often take months to develop, and their impact unfolds over years. For example, a strong brand marketing strategy can have a halo effect on paid channels. It's important to monitor internal and external factors that signal inflection points and may require a revisit of the marketing strategy.

Internal factors include audience expansion, business model evolution, and product launches. Expanding to new customer segments or geographies requires evaluating if the current brand positioning, value propositions, and channels will resonate with the newly acquired customers. Business model evolution may involve complementing a B2C offering with a clear B2B sales channel. Product launches also require careful consideration in terms of how they align with the overall marketing strategy.

External factors include macro trends, the competitive landscape, regulatory trends, and technology or user behavior changes. These factors can significantly impact the effectiveness of marketing strategies and should be monitored closely to ensure adaptation and relevance.

Now, let's connect the dots between curating content and the three domains of marketing. Curators, like marketers, face challenges in owning their content and relationships with their followers. They may start on a particular platform, but they often don't have control over the data and can become locked-in, limiting their financial benefits.

Just as brand marketing shares the story of why an organization exists, curators share the story of why certain content is valuable. They create emotional connections with their followers and increase awareness of the content they curate. However, like product marketing, curators often don't own the content they curate, limiting their ability to deliver on the brand promise.

Curators can also be seen as growth marketers. They use triggers, channels, messaging, and personalization to bring followers into the content they curate and keep them engaged. However, the lack of ownership and control over their ecosystem can hinder their ability to retain followers and monetize their efforts effectively.

To overcome these challenges, curators, like marketing leaders, need to proactively monitor internal and external factors that can impact their strategy. They should consider audience expansion by exploring new platforms or segments where their content can resonate. Additionally, they should evaluate their business model and consider diversifying revenue streams beyond a single platform.

Curators can also leverage product launches by partnering with creators or organizations to curate exclusive content or experiences. This can create additional value for their followers and help differentiate themselves in a crowded space.

When it comes to external factors, curators should pay attention to macro trends, the competitive landscape, regulatory trends, and changes in technology or user behavior. These factors can shape the content landscape and provide opportunities for curators to adapt and stay relevant.

In conclusion, marketing is more than just growth. It encompasses brand marketing, growth marketing, and product marketing, all of which need to be integrated for a complete marketing strategy. Similarly, curators face challenges in owning their content and relationships with their followers, but by proactively monitoring internal and external factors, they can overcome these challenges and unlock their creative capital.

Actionable advice for marketing leaders and curators alike:

  • 1. Embrace integration: Ensure that the strategies of brand marketing, growth marketing, and product marketing are aligned and work harmoniously to deliver on the brand promise.
  • 2. Sequence changes for compounding impact: Take a holistic approach to marketing by sequencing changes in each domain to create strategies that build upon each other and have a compounding impact.
  • 3. Be proactive and adaptable: Monitor internal and external factors that can impact your strategy, and be willing to adapt and evolve to stay ahead of the curve.

By following these actionable advice, marketing leaders and curators can amplify their impact and unlock the full potential of their strategies.

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