Meditations on First Philosophy  4th Meditation, Part 2: Will, Intellect, and the Possibility of Error  Summary & Analysis | SparkNotes thumbnail
Meditations on First Philosophy 4th Meditation, Part 2: Will, Intellect, and the Possibility of Error Summary & Analysis | SparkNotes
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The feeling of indifference is not a weakness in will but rather a lack of knowledge of what is the true or right course to pursue. But in freedom of choice, or the will, the Meditator realizes he is unlimited, and in this respect more than any other he resembles his creator. God's will may be great
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  • The feeling of indifference is not a weakness in will but rather a lack of knowledge of what is the true or right course to pursue.
  • But in freedom of choice, or the will, the Meditator realizes he is unlimited, and in this respect more than any other he resembles his creator.
  • God's will may be greater in that it is accompanied by a greater knowledge and power and that it ranges over everything, but when considering the will in the strict sense, the Meditator concludes that his will is just as great as God's.
  • ing. As a result, the will often passes judgments on matters that are not fully understood and toward which it is indifferent.
  • , he is indifferent as to whether he should assent or deny that the mind and the body are identical and is liable to make a false judgment

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