Georg [György] Lukács (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy) thumbnail
Georg [György] Lukács (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy)
plato.stanford.edu
Therefore, in modern society meaning can only be found within the inner life of the individual (1916: 61). Lukács develops an account of the connection between aesthetic genres and historical changes. He argues that drama is connected to specific historical circumstances for drama to exist, there ne
2 Users
0 Comments
32 Highlights
1 Notes

Top Highlights

  • Therefore, in modern society meaning can only be found within the inner life of the individual (1916: 61).
  • Lukács develops an account of the connection between aesthetic genres and historical changes. He argues that drama is connected to specific historical circumstances
  • for drama to exist, there needs to be a prevailing Weltanschauung (GW 15: 44) that seeks drama as its preferred mode of expression. This tragic Weltanschauung only exists in periods of societal disintegration, when individual emotions and objective facts are so mismatched as to elicit heroic forms of denial of social reality.
  • clarify the relationship between the historical changes undergone by transcendental standpoints and the “pure forms” of aesthetic genres
  • The primary object of his discussion is the epic: Lukács claims that works of art that belong to this genre—for example Homeric epic poetry and the modern novel—must always express the objective reality of social and individual human life as it is (1916: 46).

Ready to highlight and find good content?

Glasp is a social web highlighter that people can highlight and organize quotes and thoughts from the web, and access other like-minded people’s learning.